• Picturing Writing Watercolor Techniques

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 5/13/2018

    Watercolor Techniques Water color techniques Watercolor techniques Watercolor techniques

    After the children were immersed in Realistic Fiction read aloud books they are ready to write their own books. The students are using a program called Picturing Writing where they plan out their page, sketch and illustrate the picture using watercolors, and then look at the picture to write each page of their story.  Last week the students learned the eight techniques that they will choose from to illustrate their books: wash, straw, sponge, crayon resist, plastic wrap, scratch, tiissue, and salt technique. Ask your child which technique he/she used for her/his page, the setting page, of the book and which techniques are her/his favorites.   

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  • 4 WINDS- Bird Nests

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 4/23/2018

    Building nests Building Nests

     

    Building Nests

    Last Friday, we learned about birds and the different types of nests that they build. We watched a puppet show, observed pictures of a variety of nests, touched and veiwed nests with a hand lens, and built our own nests.  The students learned about the different materials that birds use, the location of nests (some build nests on the ground like killdeer birds), and the structure of nests.  Ask your child to describe the nest that they built. If you have time this week, go out and oberve any behaviors that you see birds doing-such as attracting a mate.   

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  • Character Club Portraits

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 4/23/2018

    Penny Hound Minnie and Moo

    Here are some of the finished Character Club portraits, including the character's personality traits. Aren't they beautiful!  Ask your child what part he/she painted and labeled.

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  • Character Club

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 4/23/2018

    Character Club Painting Painting

    Character Club

    Painting

    The students painted life sized portraits of their characters.  They beautifully incorportated their character's physical traits.  I was impressed how well each group worked together.  Ask your child to describe his/her character's physical and personality traits and tell how she/he knows, using evidence from the texts. 

     

     

     

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  • S.T.E.M.- Zoobots

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 4/8/2018

    Zoobots Zoobots Zoobot Zoobot Zoobots

    The students were challenged to use the external parts of an animal to help solve a human problem. The students used their expert knowledge of the animal that they researched for their All About books to plan, build, and improve their designs.  I was impressed how the students used their indepth knowledge to come up with practical ways to help people such use paws and net to swim and rescue people who are drowning, find people who are lost with keen eyesight, clean up polluntion in the ocean by storing trash in armpit pockets, help people pick up things with a beak, detect earthquakes and volcano eruptions early, use eyelids to go out in a solar eclipse to pick something up.  Ask your child about his/her zoobot and how it uses its body parts to help humans.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Open Number Line

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 4/8/2018

    As we begin our Place Value Unit in Math, we have been practicing making observations and finding missing numbers on an open number line. The students learned that the spaces in between the numbers are the same distance apart to represent counting by 1s, 5s, or 10s.  We have been practicing finding missing numbers on the open number line as well.  The students are developing a good understanding of this tool.  We will use an open number line to add and subtract double digit numbers.  Please read the link below to learn more and don't hesitate to ask me quesitons about the tool.

    Open Number Line

     

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  • Character Club- Physical Traits and Character Traits

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 4/8/2018

    Physical Traits

    Physical Traits

    Physical Traits

    We have been studying Olivia's charcter as a class during our Character Club unit.  We focused on her physical traits first and noticed she looks the same in most of the books in the series. Ask your child what Olivia looks like.  In our character club groups the students drew pictures and labeled how their character looks. Ask your child to explain his/her character's physical traits.  This week we began exploring our character's personality traits (based on what characters say and act).  We noticed that Olivia is sneaky, imaginative, and active.  We have been practicing using proof/evidence to prove that Olivia acts a certain way. Ask your child how the character in his/her character club acts and how he/she knows that.

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  • Character Clubs

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 3/22/2018

    Character Clubs

    We began our character unit of study by forming Character Clubs.  Each club began reading a book in a series and noticed how their character looks and acts. The students illustrated their folders beautifully!  Ask your child what character he/she is studying.

     

     

     

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  • STEM-Building Pooper Scoopers

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 3/9/2018

    STEM STEM STEM STEM STEM

    We designed a contraption to pick up something gross (we voted on dog/cat poop) based on what we learned about bird beaks.  While we brainstormed the best beak for the job, many of the students agreed that the wabler (tweezer like) beak would be the best for picking up poop in tall grass.  We used clay to simulate the poop, planned out our ideas, built them, tested them, and improved them.  I was pleasantly surprised with the designs that the students came us with.  They perservered and had a lot of fun trying to solve this human problem by mimicing a bird's beak. 

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  • Bird Beak Experiment

    Posted by Julia Seligman on 3/8/2018

    Beak Experiment

    Beak Experiment

    Beak Experiment

    We experiemented picking up food (macaroni) with a beak like a warbler (tweezer like) and a duck (wide spoon like). The students found that the duck bill was more efficient.  Then we scattered rocks (beans) and expermented which beak was better at picking up food only (if rocks were picked up then the students had to put them back).  The students found out that the tweezer beak was the most efficent.  Birds with this type of beak are good at picking up seeds and eating insects in tall grass where birds with duck bills are good at scooping up plants and fish out of the water.  From this experiment and our past research, the students made connections about the shape of a beak and the food that it eats.  We will be able to use these patterns to predict what other birds eat by looking at the shape and size of their beaks.  The students had a fun time experimenting!  Ask your child which beak was easier for him/her to pick up food without picking up a lot of rocks.

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